In Living Color: Drawing Outside of the Lines

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Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.
— Pablo Picasso

Remember art as a young child? Finger painting was messy. You were allowed to blend all kinds of colors any way your little digits and heart desired. Your refrigerator was a gallery of all your lovely, smeared creations. Imperfection was actually celebrated.

Then something happened.

The lines in the coloring books became more bold, more apparent. As you grew up, no longer were the hodgepodge hues welcomed. The colors now had to make sense, had to fit perfectly.

Neither creativity or imagination are linear. Yet, we were instructed to live in a single file line, following behind the others.

This was around the time societal standards were imposed. You were told what behavior is right and what behavior is wrong; what makes you a "good" boy or girl and what makes you a "bad" boy or girl. What is considered "beautiful" and what is deemed "ugly." In the midst of this domestication, we lost our freedom of coloring outside of the lines. Fearful of making mistakes. Worried how we would be perceived. Afraid to stand out. And in turn, our imaginations suffered. We were told even individuality has its limits. Neither creativity or imagination are linear. Yet, we were instructed to live in a single file line, following behind the others. As adults, we now fit the mold, playing it safe, neglecting our youthful desire for wonder and adventure.

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This month, we are going back to our childlike ways. We are In Living Color: Drawing Outside of the Lines. We are releasing our inhibitions and tapping back into our inner child. Welcome to our playground!